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H1N1 Swine Flu Information

Content Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Santa Rosa Junior College
Marin Community College
Disaster Resistant California Comminty Colleges

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is swine flu?
  2. What are the signs and symptoms of swine flu in people?
  3. How does swine flu spread?
  4. What should I do to keep from getting the flu?
  5. Are there medicines to treat swine flu?
  6. What surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination?
  7. What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?
  8. What is the best way to keep from spreading the virus through coughing or sneezing?
  9. What is the best technique for washing my hands to avoid getting the flu?
  10. What should I do if I get sick?
  11. How serious is swine flu infection?
  12. Can I get swine influenza from eating or preparing pork?
  13. Additional Flu Recommendations for our College Community?
  14. Student Removal Due to Communicable or Non-Communicable Health Condition
  15. Additional H1N1 Flu Video, Websites and Brochures:

Back to TopWhat is swine flu?
Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get swine flu, but human infections can and do happen. Swine flu viruses have been reported to spread from person-to-person, but in the past, this transmission was limited and not sustained beyond three people.

Back to TopWhat are the signs and symptoms of swine flu in people?
The symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of regular human flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with swine flu. Like seasonal flu, swine flu may cause a worsening of underlying chronic medical conditions.

Back to TopHow does swine flu spread?
Spread of this swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is thought to be happening in the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing of people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

Back to TopWhat should I do to keep from getting the flu?
First and most important: wash your hands. Try to stay in good general health. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food. Try not touch surfaces that may be contaminated with the flu virus. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Back to TopAre there medicines to treat swine flu?
Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) that fight against the flu by keeping flu viruses from reproducing in your body. If you get sick, antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For treatment, antiviral drugs work best if started soon after getting sick (within 2 days of symptoms).

Back to TopWhat surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination?
Germs can be spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person move through the air. Germs can be spread when a person touches respiratory droplets from another person on a surface like a desk and then touches their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands.

Back to TopWhat can I do to protect myself from getting sick?
There is no vaccine available right now to protect against swine flu. There are everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza. Take these everyday steps to protect your health:

• Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
• Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
• If you get sick with influenza, CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

Back to TopWhat is the best way to keep from spreading the virus through coughing or sneezing?
If you are sick, limit your contact with other people as much as possible. Do not go to work or school if ill. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Put your used tissue in the waste basket. Cover your cough or sneeze if you do not have a tissue. Then, clean your hands, and do so every time you cough or sneeze

Back to TopWhat is the best technique for washing my hands to avoid getting the flu?
Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. Wash with soap and water. or clean with alcohol-based hand cleaner. we recommend that when you wash your hands -- with soap and warm water -- that you wash for 15 to 20 seconds. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used. You can find them in most supermarkets and drugstores. If using gel, rub your hands until the gel is dry. The gel doesn't need water to work; the alcohol in it kills the germs on your hands.

Back to TopWhat should I do if I get sick?
If you live in areas where swine influenza cases have been identified and become ill with influenza-like symptoms, including fever, body aches, runny nose, sore throat, nausea, or vomiting or diarrhea, you may want to contact their health care provider, particularly if you are worried about your symptoms. Your health care provider will determine whether influenza testing or treatment is needed.

If you are sick, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from spreading your illness to others.  Staying at home means you should not leave your home except to seek medical care – avoid normal activities, including work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that people with influenza-like illness remain at home until at least 24 hours after they are free of fever (100° F [37.8°C]), or signs of a fever without the use of fever-reducing medications except to get medical care or for other necessities.

This is a change from the previous recommendation that ill persons stay home for 7 days after illness onset or until 24 hours after the resolution of symptoms, whichever was longer. The new recommendation applies to camps, schools, businesses, mass gatherings, and other community settings where the majority of people are not at increased risk for influenza complications. This guidance does not apply to health care settings where the exclusion period should be continued for 7 days from symptom onset or until the resolution of symptoms, whichever is longer;

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/exclusion.htm

If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.

In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

• Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
• Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
• Sudden dizziness
• Confusion
• Severe or persistent vomiting

Back to TopHow serious is swine flu infection?
Like seasonal flu, swine flu in humans can vary in severity from mild to severe

Back to TopCan I get swine influenza from eating or preparing pork?
No. Swine influenza viruses are not spread by food. You cannot get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork products is safe

Content Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Santa Rosa Junior College
Marin Community College
Disaster Resistant California Comminty Colleges

Back to TopAdditional Flu Recommendations for our College Community

When students and employees are sick with influenza-like illness at the College, in classrooms, workplaces, or at public gatherings, they need encouragement and direction to go home to take care of themselves. They should then call their health-care provider to see if they could benefit from flu testing or from antiviral medications.

Students

Students demonstrating flu-like symptoms are encouraged to self isolate at home, to visit their own doctor, and should be advised not to come to campus.

Notify your instructors by e-mail or telephone to let them know that you are sick with influenza-like illness and when your symptoms began. Receive direction from your instructors on how you may be able to meet any class requirements you miss during your illness related absence.

Check your course syllabus for attendance and make up policies. We encourage you to communicate with your instructor as soon as possible.

Faculty and Staff

If you are ill and unable to report to work, follow the normal procedures for calling your supervisor. 

Report Illness

Should you contract the H1N1 virus, please report it to your instructor/supervisor. This will allow the campus to take any appropriate steps needed. (Note: any such report would be treated confidentially).

Supervisors, please notify your Vice President of any reports of H1N1 illness. They will contact Trudy Walton, Vice President of Student Services.

Home Self-Care

Home self-care of this illness includes Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen for headache, fever, and body aches. Monitor your fever with a thermometer. Drink clear fluids throughout the day and get sufficient rest. If you have a cough that is unrelieved with over the counter cough remedies or signs of severe illness, contact your health-care provider.

Stay at Home Reminder

Stay home per the guidelines issued by the CDC and Public Health Department as follows: Those experiencing flu-like symptoms should stay at home for at least  24 hours after their fever is gone without the use of fever reducing medicine.

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/exclusion.htm

Back to TopStudent Removal Due to Communicable or Non-Communicable Health Condition

A health condition (whether communicable or non-communicable) for which continued participation in the educational program presents a valid concern for the protection of the health and safety of the student, other students, college personnel, or members of the public.

Both forms of the flu are highly contagious through airborne respiratory droplets. It is the responsibility of faculty to ensure a safe and healthy environment in the classroom for everyone; therefore instructors have the legal authority to remove students from the classroom up to two consecutive class meetings for “Good Cause” when contagious illness is apparent.

The instructor shall immediately provide a written report of the reasons for the action and a recommendation for further action to Trudy Walton, Vice President of Student Services.


Back to TopAdditional H1N1 Flu Video, Websites and Brochures:

DRCCC’s Pandemic Education and Prevention Video (9:50 min.)

CDC Homepage on H1N1 Flu

Prepare, Plan and Stay Informed

“Take 3” Actions to Fight the Flu
These actions will protect against 2009 H1N1 too!

CDC Says "Take 3" Steps To Fight The Flu
These actions will protect against the new H1N1 too!

CDC's Tri-fold brochure on H1N1 virus

Content Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Santa Rosa Junior College
Marin Community College
Disaster Resistant California Comminty Colleges

 

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San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, California 95207
(209) 954-5151

 

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